Should kids play contact sports? The risks of concussions and heart issues are real, but so are the benefits, physicians say.

By Jennifer Latson It’s extremely uncommon for an athlete to go into sudden cardiac arrest while playing a sport, as Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin did during a football game on Jan. 2. But when it happens, parents face a grim reminder of the dangers of contact sports — and some wonder how to keep [Continue Reading]

Ali Vise

Small Incisions, Big Benefits: How treatment for heart valve disease is becoming less invasive and more accessible

By Jennifer Latson Heart valve disease affects about 2.5 percent of the population, or more than eight million Americans, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, causing more than 25,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. It’s especially prevalent among older people, since the heart valves can become lined with calcium deposits [Continue Reading]

Ali Vise

Great-grandmother with atrial fibrillation receives groundbreaking procedure to remove need for blood thinners

Great-grandmother Penny Null, 75, is an avid gardener, baker and quilter. On most days, you can find her at home doing what she loves most. She cooks fresh bread from scratch, often two loaves per week. She patiently cares for her huge garden, freely giving out her canned produce, including green beans, creamed corn and [Continue Reading]

apape

Restarting a Heart: In cases of cardiac arrest, quick intervention can save a life — even if you have no medical training.

By Jennifer Latson When someone’s heart stops beating, acting quickly can mean the difference between life and death. More than 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside of hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association, and 90 percent of those sudden cardiac arrests prove fatal. But they don’t have to be. Immediate CPR, or cardiopulmonary [Continue Reading]

apape

apape

Heart attack vs. sudden cardiac arrest: Do you know the difference?

Q&A with Dr. Daniel Hermann, interventional cardiologist, Memorial Hermann Health System According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. There are roughly 800,000 heart attacks reported annually nationwide. Alongside these statistics, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests [Continue Reading]

Ali Vise